Is the Internet Killing the News Media?

by admin on March 31, 2011

LeonardSipes.Com

Dear readers. As you are aware, I love the TWIT network at http://twit.tv . Two veterans of the network re-branded an existing show to focus exclusively on the world of social or digital media. What was “Net at Night” is now “The Social Hour.”  The comments below are directed at the show’s new digital and social focus. Len.

Hi Amber and Sarah: Congratulations on the “new” show. A forum devoted exclusively to the impact of social or digital media is welcomed. We love our gadgets but the larger implications of digital media are staggering.

Possibly the most profound beyond commerce is the impact of digital on the news media.  See the recent report from the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism—“The State of the News Media-2011”.Source: http://stateofthemedia.org/ .

In summary, “It may be that in the digital realm the news industry is no longer in control of its own future.”

In 2010, every news organization experienced declining audiences except for the web. Newsrooms are declining and stories are likely not being told. Some suggest “a general devaluing….and de-skilling of the profession.”

It’s interesting that the geniuses in Google and Apple can’t get social and newspapers can’t figure out the Internet. According to one commenter, “We had nearly 15 years to figure out the web and, as an industry, we newspaper people are no good at it.”

The digital world has completely upended the profession of journalism. I understand that’s not a new observation, but the recent Pew report doesn’t document a struggle, it declares a partial surrender.

Forty-six percent of people now get news online at least three times a week. Only local news is a more potent platform at 50 percent and that will change to the Internet’s favor soon. The numbers of people who read a newspaper yesterday dropped to 37 percent.

For better or worse, the world of news is dramatically changing.  While mainstream media won’t disappear overnight, it’s clear that they will adapt or have their influence greatly reduced.

I ‘m greatly worried that highly stilled, hard-noised journalists may suffer further reductions in numbers.  I believe that democracy is better served by well-trained journalists.

Best, Len Sipes at http://leonardsipes.com

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